Sunday, March 30, 2008

Record NH Snowfall for 2008

With the snowstorm we had Thursday night, we have had the most snowfall in New Hampshire since 1873. Now, the snowfall of 113 inches does not quite compare with the normal over 300 inches in the Keewenaw Peninsula of Michigan, but it is still substantial. The roof of my shed did indeed collapse, and as of March 30 (today) I still can't do anything about it because there is still two feet of unmelted snow on top of it.

But from this point forward, the "oldtimers" around here cannot say how the winters of old were so much more severe, with so much more snow (i.e., the climate has really changed...). Unless they are more than 135 years old, we saw more snow this winter than any oldtimer ever did.

My kids will be able to tell stories of that winter of '08, and how the roof on their house collapsed. How they had 37 snow days and had to go to school the entire summer to make up for it. How the cat went outside and got buried in a snowdrift and we didn't find her til the spring...

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

You should watch professor Bob Carter's lecture on subject of global warming on youtube. There are four parts to it. The risk is not of global warming but of global cooling. So the winter 2008 experienced in NH may be only the first of many cold winters that your children will speak about.

AK

John Lott said...

Couldn't find the cat until spring? That is pretty bad.

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Travis said...

Oh joy.

I'll be at Tuck this year and the coldest climate I've ever lived in was Tallahassee.

I wonder though, does the harsh winter increase academic productivity or decrease? I could see it argued either way, with the increases in productivity resulting from less activity options due to the snow. But then again, maybe movement, communication and just plain attitude may be changed for the worse.